Kylie Tales

kylieleane.com

Some of these are old - one is new, I have three more to do…gahhh…
But for now — The Ten Armed Sun of Pennadot, for Pennadot, once it represented the Ten Races of Livila for Pennadot was the ‘hub land, under the Arc of the Sun’, but after the Dawn Wars and the Beginning of the Age of the Dragon’s Conquest there is no longer Ten Races, so the Ten Armed Sun has now simply become a symbol for Humanity. 
The Blood Tear and Flame of the Messenger Amanda — this is the symbol that Messengers are known by, the blood red tear and the flame. This is often carved into inn walls, or cave walls, so Messengers will know it is a safe haven, or a Messenger run inn. It is also the symbol of the House of Flames and the Blood Amanda (the Messenger Army).
The Silver Goblet is the flag of the Batitic Twilight Empire — which is not supposed to exist anymore since the Sin’musk’qu Wars when the Starborn Paladins overthrew the Batitic White Council — but — some say there is a stirring in Sin’musk’qu of an uprising, that the Twilight Empire shall return.
The Starborn Star — a symbol that used to be flown by the Starborn Sovereign but now it is flown by the Paladins, the last remaining survivors of an era long gone.  

I still have the Kattamont Prides of Utillia, the Fire Elementals and the Zaprex Empire to do — but I am a little stuck on the Zaprex Empire…I have utterly no idea what would represent such a powerful race that collapsed in the manner they did. I really wanted something that would highlight their Egyptian beliefs/heritage so I guess I might go down that road in the end…  
ZoomInfo
Some of these are old - one is new, I have three more to do…gahhh…
But for now — The Ten Armed Sun of Pennadot, for Pennadot, once it represented the Ten Races of Livila for Pennadot was the ‘hub land, under the Arc of the Sun’, but after the Dawn Wars and the Beginning of the Age of the Dragon’s Conquest there is no longer Ten Races, so the Ten Armed Sun has now simply become a symbol for Humanity. 
The Blood Tear and Flame of the Messenger Amanda — this is the symbol that Messengers are known by, the blood red tear and the flame. This is often carved into inn walls, or cave walls, so Messengers will know it is a safe haven, or a Messenger run inn. It is also the symbol of the House of Flames and the Blood Amanda (the Messenger Army).
The Silver Goblet is the flag of the Batitic Twilight Empire — which is not supposed to exist anymore since the Sin’musk’qu Wars when the Starborn Paladins overthrew the Batitic White Council — but — some say there is a stirring in Sin’musk’qu of an uprising, that the Twilight Empire shall return.
The Starborn Star — a symbol that used to be flown by the Starborn Sovereign but now it is flown by the Paladins, the last remaining survivors of an era long gone.  

I still have the Kattamont Prides of Utillia, the Fire Elementals and the Zaprex Empire to do — but I am a little stuck on the Zaprex Empire…I have utterly no idea what would represent such a powerful race that collapsed in the manner they did. I really wanted something that would highlight their Egyptian beliefs/heritage so I guess I might go down that road in the end…  
ZoomInfo
Some of these are old - one is new, I have three more to do…gahhh…
But for now — The Ten Armed Sun of Pennadot, for Pennadot, once it represented the Ten Races of Livila for Pennadot was the ‘hub land, under the Arc of the Sun’, but after the Dawn Wars and the Beginning of the Age of the Dragon’s Conquest there is no longer Ten Races, so the Ten Armed Sun has now simply become a symbol for Humanity. 
The Blood Tear and Flame of the Messenger Amanda — this is the symbol that Messengers are known by, the blood red tear and the flame. This is often carved into inn walls, or cave walls, so Messengers will know it is a safe haven, or a Messenger run inn. It is also the symbol of the House of Flames and the Blood Amanda (the Messenger Army).
The Silver Goblet is the flag of the Batitic Twilight Empire — which is not supposed to exist anymore since the Sin’musk’qu Wars when the Starborn Paladins overthrew the Batitic White Council — but — some say there is a stirring in Sin’musk’qu of an uprising, that the Twilight Empire shall return.
The Starborn Star — a symbol that used to be flown by the Starborn Sovereign but now it is flown by the Paladins, the last remaining survivors of an era long gone.  

I still have the Kattamont Prides of Utillia, the Fire Elementals and the Zaprex Empire to do — but I am a little stuck on the Zaprex Empire…I have utterly no idea what would represent such a powerful race that collapsed in the manner they did. I really wanted something that would highlight their Egyptian beliefs/heritage so I guess I might go down that road in the end…  
ZoomInfo
Some of these are old - one is new, I have three more to do…gahhh…
But for now — The Ten Armed Sun of Pennadot, for Pennadot, once it represented the Ten Races of Livila for Pennadot was the ‘hub land, under the Arc of the Sun’, but after the Dawn Wars and the Beginning of the Age of the Dragon’s Conquest there is no longer Ten Races, so the Ten Armed Sun has now simply become a symbol for Humanity. 
The Blood Tear and Flame of the Messenger Amanda — this is the symbol that Messengers are known by, the blood red tear and the flame. This is often carved into inn walls, or cave walls, so Messengers will know it is a safe haven, or a Messenger run inn. It is also the symbol of the House of Flames and the Blood Amanda (the Messenger Army).
The Silver Goblet is the flag of the Batitic Twilight Empire — which is not supposed to exist anymore since the Sin’musk’qu Wars when the Starborn Paladins overthrew the Batitic White Council — but — some say there is a stirring in Sin’musk’qu of an uprising, that the Twilight Empire shall return.
The Starborn Star — a symbol that used to be flown by the Starborn Sovereign but now it is flown by the Paladins, the last remaining survivors of an era long gone.  

I still have the Kattamont Prides of Utillia, the Fire Elementals and the Zaprex Empire to do — but I am a little stuck on the Zaprex Empire…I have utterly no idea what would represent such a powerful race that collapsed in the manner they did. I really wanted something that would highlight their Egyptian beliefs/heritage so I guess I might go down that road in the end…  
ZoomInfo

Some of these are old - one is new, I have three more to do…gahhh…

But for now — The Ten Armed Sun of Pennadot, for Pennadot, once it represented the Ten Races of Livila for Pennadot was the ‘hub land, under the Arc of the Sun’, but after the Dawn Wars and the Beginning of the Age of the Dragon’s Conquest there is no longer Ten Races, so the Ten Armed Sun has now simply become a symbol for Humanity. 

The Blood Tear and Flame of the Messenger Amanda — this is the symbol that Messengers are known by, the blood red tear and the flame. This is often carved into inn walls, or cave walls, so Messengers will know it is a safe haven, or a Messenger run inn. It is also the symbol of the House of Flames and the Blood Amanda (the Messenger Army).

The Silver Goblet is the flag of the Batitic Twilight Empire — which is not supposed to exist anymore since the Sin’musk’qu Wars when the Starborn Paladins overthrew the Batitic White Council — but — some say there is a stirring in Sin’musk’qu of an uprising, that the Twilight Empire shall return.

The Starborn Star — a symbol that used to be flown by the Starborn Sovereign but now it is flown by the Paladins, the last remaining survivors of an era long gone.  

I still have the Kattamont Prides of Utillia, the Fire Elementals and the Zaprex Empire to do — but I am a little stuck on the Zaprex Empire…I have utterly no idea what would represent such a powerful race that collapsed in the manner they did. I really wanted something that would highlight their Egyptian beliefs/heritage so I guess I might go down that road in the end…  

Sami’s shiny wacky colour secret project thingy. I actually struggled with this one, and I think it shows, but considering I spent an entire afternoon on it, I’m just like…meh…done…I’m okay, I’m okay. I’ll live. I’m learning, I’m growing. I will get better, I’ve just started working on sitting for seven to eight hours at the computer again painting, it will take time to rediscover the computer painter in me.  

Exciting news folks! The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.
But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.
I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*
There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 
Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 
ZoomInfo
Exciting news folks! The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.
But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.
I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*
There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 
Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 
ZoomInfo
Exciting news folks! The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.
But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.
I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*
There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 
Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 
ZoomInfo
Exciting news folks! The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.
But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.
I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*
There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 
Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 
ZoomInfo
Exciting news folks! The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.
But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.
I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*
There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 
Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 
ZoomInfo

Exciting news folks! 
The illustrated Hardcover of Key is now out and about, ready to be revealed in all its shiny glory. I wish I could promise signed copies, but Australia Post is murderous in its postage prices *sobs* — so I am still working on that.

But as I am sure you have all seen my gradually get through the illustrations in this hardcover, and your encouragement throughout the process has meant the world to me. Creating a beautiful book, in not just words, but in the art and the design has always been my biggest dream and the release of this hardcover is the realization of a childhood dream.

I owe a lot of people much for helping me reach this far into the stars. So thank you all! *hugs*

There will be an ebook of the hardcover-version of Key being released around mid-October through my website store. 

Hardcover on Amazon —- KEY 


The Lord of the Rings: The Two TowersBook III, Chapter One - The Departure of Boromir
From the Gate of Kings the North Wind rides, and past the roaring falls; And clear and cold about the tower its loud horn calls. 'What news from the North, O mighty wind, do you bring to me today? What news of Boromir the Bold? For he is long away.’ 'Beneath Amon Hen I heard his cry. There many foes he fought. His cloven shield, his broken sword, they to the water brought. His head so proud, his face so fair, his limbs they laid to rest; And Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, bore him upon its breast.’ 'O Boromir! The Tower of Guard shall ever northward gaze To Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, until the end of days.’ 
ZoomInfo

The Lord of the Rings: The Two TowersBook III, Chapter One - The Departure of Boromir
From the Gate of Kings the North Wind rides, and past the roaring falls; And clear and cold about the tower its loud horn calls. 'What news from the North, O mighty wind, do you bring to me today? What news of Boromir the Bold? For he is long away.’ 'Beneath Amon Hen I heard his cry. There many foes he fought. His cloven shield, his broken sword, they to the water brought. His head so proud, his face so fair, his limbs they laid to rest; And Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, bore him upon its breast.’ 'O Boromir! The Tower of Guard shall ever northward gaze To Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, until the end of days.’ 
ZoomInfo

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Book III, Chapter One - The Departure of Boromir

From the Gate of Kings the North Wind rides, and past the roaring falls; 
And clear and cold about the tower its loud horn calls. 
'What news from the North, O mighty wind, do you bring to me today? 
What news of Boromir the Bold? For he is long away.’ 
'Beneath Amon Hen I heard his cry. There many foes he fought. 
His cloven shield, his broken sword, they to the water brought. 
His head so proud, his face so fair, his limbs they laid to rest; 
And Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, bore him upon its breast.’ 
'O Boromir! The Tower of Guard shall ever northward gaze 
To Rauros, golden Rauros-falls, until the end of days.’ 

(via olorispublishing)

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo
littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:









Source
"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti
When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 
Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 
"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."
Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 
"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."
Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.
One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.
It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.
"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."”

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.





LOOK



AT



THESE

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONE




 







LOOK
ZoomInfo

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

image

image

image

imageimage

image

image

image

Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

image

image

image

image

image

LOOKimage

image

image

image

ATimage

image

image

image

THESEimage

image

LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

image

image

image

image

 image

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LOOK

(via molten-rainbows)

For lost-in-the-land-of-stories — cause she is far from home and loved ones right now — but since she is one of the most beautiful women in the world, she deserves smiles and hugs.

I am also pretty sure my Netherland friends are all magical, and cannot tell me (a Muggle) because you know, secret stuff — but I’m onto you guys! It has to be why you’re all so awesome and do all these…awesome things, right? Right? :P

lost-in-the-land-of-stories I know you cannot tell me you are magical, but I’m sure you’re studying lots of awesome university wizard-y things while abroad. Look, I gave you dragon-hide boots! 

Secret project thing…
Told you I’d colour it ;) Daniel being all shiny and royal. I have a thing for wacky colours lately. Really digging it. 
Obviously this one goes with the Citla’ picture I uploaded awhile back. Funny how the two characters I very rarely draw end up being the two who get drawn first…then again…I am madly in love with them in Book 2, so maybe that’s why ^^

Prince Daniel sketch, for an up and coming project (obviously will be coloured). He is so adorable…
This is from Book 1, which is weird having to do art from Book 1 when I am writing Book 2 and all the characters have grown up and come such a long way…Daniel hugely so.  

It was time for a change. So I cut my hair. This is a huge deal for me, I have been trying to grow it out since the last time I had it cut short (about two years ago, my hair grows quickly) but my sister and mother complain to me that I never wear it down and it looks sick anyway, I don’t take care of it. My illness, funnily enough, actually effects my hair and nails (you do not want to know what it has done to my toes…so sad) it makes them very brittle so I struggle to keep both hair and nails well, though I keep getting told to have more supplements! XD 
Anyway, I got to the point that I was so self-conscious of my hair that I just decided to cut it but my little sister didn’t want me to do it before the wedding as she wanted it long so I waited. The deed is done. It is gone. The hair-dresser kept telling me it wasn’t going to work because apparently I have ‘movement’ in my hair and I am going to need to buy a hair-drier, a hair-straighter and do all those hair-things I never do because dear-me I am just a boring person who just…has hair. But on the plus side, my head feels about a billion times lighter! 
ZoomInfo
Camera

Samsung GT-I9300

ISO

160

Aperture

f/2.8

Exposure

1/20th

Focal Length

2mm

It was time for a change. 
So I cut my hair. This is a huge deal for me, I have been trying to grow it out since the last time I had it cut short (about two years ago, my hair grows quickly) but my sister and mother complain to me that I never wear it down and it looks sick anyway, I don’t take care of it. 
My illness, funnily enough, actually effects my hair and nails (you do not want to know what it has done to my toes…so sad) it makes them very brittle so I struggle to keep both hair and nails well, though I keep getting told to have more supplements! XD 

Anyway, I got to the point that I was so self-conscious of my hair that I just decided to cut it but my little sister didn’t want me to do it before the wedding as she wanted it long so I waited. The deed is done. It is gone. The hair-dresser kept telling me it wasn’t going to work because apparently I have ‘movement’ in my hair and I am going to need to buy a hair-drier, a hair-straighter and do all those hair-things I never do because dear-me I am just a boring person who just…has hair. But on the plus side, my head feels about a billion times lighter!